The Meaning Behind Brave Women Posting "Me Too" In Their Facebook Status

Around 10:30pm on Sunday I was scrolling through my Facebook feed and I noticed one of my good friends post the status of “Me too.” There were two sad reactions on her post. I could tell that this had some sort of meaning so I continued scrolling for some context clues, if anyone else had posted anything. They hadn’t yet so I turned to Google.

I tracked the status back to actress, Alyssa Milano’s tweet.

 Photo taken from Twitter

Photo taken from Twitter

“If everyone who has been sexually assaulted or harassed wrote “me too” as a status, it might give people the idea of the magnitude of the problem.” 
The tweet is currently at 40K replies.

I found myself feeling too uncomfortable to post “me too” on Facebook. My Facebook community is private, filled with my personal thoughts, beliefs, and causes. People I actually know fill my news feed. Friends, family, coworkers.

And I chose not to post on Facebook because of some weird fear that I would be “causing drama”. I shut my laptop and got ready for bed.  

But the fact of the matter is just because I didn’t post it, doesn’t mean that it wasn’t true. I minimize it. I compartmentalize. I throw it into a corner of my mind where I don’t have to look at the ugly. But just because I chose to ignore it does not mean I that I haven’t been subjected to assault and harassment.

You always think to yourself, “Of course, I would say something”. “That I would never be a victim of sexual assault”. But you so easily find yourself rationalizing the incident in your mind as something trivial, as something to laugh off, as something to never think about again as a kind of coping mechanism.

But by the time I woke up this morning I saw the “me too”s sadly flooding my feed.

 Photo taken from Twitter

Photo taken from Twitter

 Photo taken from Facebook

Photo taken from Facebook

 Photo taken from Facebook

Photo taken from Facebook

 Photo taken from Facebook

Photo taken from Facebook

By seeing women come forward with the bravery to admit something so dark, so vulnerable, so personal, so awful, it gave me the courage to post myself in front of an online audience who knows me well.

 Photo taken from Facebook

Photo taken from Facebook

I want to thank the brave women around me for posting because it surrounded me with a safe space and gave me the confidence to create awareness. I stand in solidarity with you. And I will continue to create awareness in hope for a future where our daughters and granddaughters won’t have to say “me too.”